Trip to Istanbul

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2017

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Trip to Istanbul, Turkey, early July 2010.

Taken with Pentax K100D Super, smc Pentax-DA 18-55mm F3.5-5.6 kit lens, and Sears Mod.No.202 135mm F2.8 lenses.

The Ivan Vazov National Theatre (Bulgarian: Народен театър „Иван Вазов“, Naroden teatar „Ivan Vazov“) is Bulgaria's national theatre, as well as the oldest and most authoritative theatre in the country and one of the important landmarks of Sofia, the capital of Bulgaria.

Nicely lit building in the center of Sofia, Bulgaria, between Bulgarian National Bank and Council of Ministers.

The St. Alexander Nevsky Cathedral (Bulgarian: Храм-паметник „Свети Александър Невски“, Hram-pametnik „Sveti Aleksandar Nevski“) is a Bulgarian Orthodox cathedral in Sofia, the capital of Bulgaria. Built in Neo-Byzantine style, it serves as the cathedral church of the Patriarch of Bulgaria and it is one of the largest Eastern Orthodox cathedrals in the world, as well as one of Sofia's symbols and primary tourist attractions.

A view towards Bosphorus Bridge and Asian part of the city. The 15 July Martyrs Bridge (Turkish: 15 Temmuz Şehitler Köprüsü previously known as İstanbul Boğaziçi Köprüsü), also called the First Bosphorus Bridge (Turkish: 1. Boğaziçi Köprüsü) or First Bridge (Turkish: Birinci Köprü), is one of three suspension bridges spanning the Bosphorus strait (Turkish: Boğaziçi) in Istanbul, Turkey, thus connecting Europe and Asia (alongside Fatih Sultan Mehmet Bridge and Yavuz Sultan Selim Bridge). The bridge extends between Ortaköy (in Europe) and Beylerbeyi (in Asia).

A view over Bosphorus strait towards Asian part of Istanbul. The Bosphorus (/ˈbɒsfərəs/ or /ˈbɒspərəs/)[1] or Bosporus (/ˈbɒspərəs/; Ancient Greek: Βόσπορος, Bósporos; Turkish: Boğaziçi, pronounced [boːaziˈt͡ʃi]) is a narrow, natural strait and an internationally significant waterway located in northwestern Turkey. It forms part of the continental boundary between Europe and Asia, and separates Asian Turkey from European Turkey. The world's narrowest strait used for international navigation, the Bosphorus connects the Black Sea with the Sea of Marmara, and, by extension via the Dardanelles, the Aegean and Mediterranean Seas.

A view over Golden Horn towards Hagia Sophia museum (Ayasofya Müzesi). Hagia Sophia (/ˈhɑːɪə soʊˈfiə/; from the Greek: Ἁγία Σοφία, [aˈʝia soˈfia]), "Holy Wisdom"; Latin: Sancta Sophia or Sancta Sapientia; Turkish: Ayasofya) was a Greek Orthodox Christian patriarchal basilica (church), later an imperial mosque, and now a museum (Ayasofya Müzesi) in Istanbul, Turkey. From the date of its construction in 537 AD, and until 1453, it served as an Eastern Orthodox cathedral and seat of the Patriarch of Constantinople, except between 1204 and 1261, when it was converted by the Fourth Crusaders to a Catholic cathedral under the Latin Empire. The building was later converted into an Ottoman mosque from 29 May 1453 until 1931. It was then secularized and opened as a museum on 1 February 1935.

The Maiden's Tower (Turkish: Kız Kulesi), also known as Leander's Tower (Tower of Leandros) since the medieval Byzantine period, is a tower lying on a small islet located at the southern entrance of the Bosphorus strait 200 m (220 yd) from the coast of Üsküdar in Istanbul, Turkey.

A view over passenger ship travelling along Golden Horn towards Gülhane Park (Gülhane Parkı). Gülhane Park (Turkish: Gülhane Parkı, "Rosehouse Park"; from Persian: گلخانه Gulkhāna, "house of flowers") is a historical urban park in the Eminönü district of Istanbul, Turkey; it is located adjacent to and on the grounds of the Topkapı Palace.

Leaving Üsküdar district, on Asian side of Istanbul. Üsküdar (Turkish pronunciation: [ysˈcydaɾ]), formerly known as Scutari (Scutàrion, Σκουτάριον in Greek), is a large and densely populated district and municipality of Istanbul, Turkey, on the Anatolian shore of the Bosphorus.

A view from the Asian side of Istanbul, from Üsküdar, over Bosphorus strait and Golden Horn towards Fatih district. Istanbul (UK /ɪstænbʊl/ or US /-stɑːn-/; Turkish: İstanbul [isˈtɑnbuɫ] ( listen)), historically known as Constantinople and Byzantium, is the most populous city in Turkey and the country's economic, cultural, and historic center. Istanbul is a transcontinental city in Eurasia, straddling the Bosphorus strait (which separates Europe and Asia) between the Sea of Marmara and the Black Sea.

The Galata Tower (Galata Kulesi in Turkish) — called Christea Turris (the Tower of Christ in Latin) by the Genoese — is a medieval stone tower in the Galata/Karaköy quarter of Istanbul, Turkey, just to the north of the Golden Horn's junction with the Bosphorus. One of the city's most striking landmarks, it is a high, cone-capped cylinder that dominates the skyline and offers a panoramic vista of Istanbul's historic peninsula and its environs.

A view from Galata tower (Galata Kulesi) over Golden Horn estuary towards Fatih district. The Golden Horn (Turkish: Altın Boynuz; Ancient Greek: Χρυσόκερας, Chrysókeras; Latin: Sinus Ceratinus), also known by its modern Turkish name as Haliç, is a major urban waterway and the primary inlet of the Bosphorus in Istanbul, Turkey.

A view from Galata tower (Galata Kulesi) towards Eminönü district and its ferry terminal. Eminönü is a former district of Istanbul in Turkey, now a neighbourhood of Fatih district. This is the heart of the walled city of Constantine, the focus of a history of incredible richness. Eminönü covers roughly the area on which the ancient Byzantium was built.

A view from Galata tower (Galata Kulesi) towards Hagia Sophia museum. Hagia Sophia (/ˈhɑːɪə soʊˈfiə/; from the Greek: Ἁγία Σοφία, [aˈʝia soˈfia]), "Holy Wisdom"; Latin: Sancta Sophia or Sancta Sapientia; Turkish: Ayasofya) was a Greek Orthodox Christian patriarchal basilica (church), later an imperial mosque, and now a museum (Ayasofya Müzesi) in Istanbul, Turkey. From the date of its construction in 537 AD, and until 1453, it served as an Eastern Orthodox cathedral and seat of the Patriarch of Constantinople, except between 1204 and 1261, when it was converted by the Fourth Crusaders to a Catholic cathedral under the Latin Empire. The building was later converted into an Ottoman mosque from 29 May 1453 until 1931. It was then secularized and opened as a museum on 1 February 1935.